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Statement by Counsellor of the Chinese Delegation Mr. JIA Guide at the 3rd Committee of the UNGA 61st Session on the Agenda Item of International Drug Control (Item 98) and Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Item 99)
2006/10/04

2006/10/04

Mr. Chairman,

The Outcome Document of 2005 World Summit reflects the unanimous view of the member states that issues such as drugs, transnational crime and terrorism adversely affect development, peace, security and human rights throughout the world, and that they require that the international community take collective actions to respond to such challenges. The Chinese delegation is pleased to note that the efforts of the international community have produced initial results. The 2006 World Drug Report by UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) indicates that there is evidence that the world's drug problem has been contained. Opium production is on the decline, the production of cocaine has generally stabilized, and there has been a steady alleviation of the drug situation in the Golden Triangle region. We appreciate the determination and efforts of Myanmar, Laos and Thailand in drug control, which are truly encouraging. For many years, the Chinese government has engaged in various forms of cooperation with Myanmar and Laos in alternative development. We have made substantial financial and material contributions to support alternative crops in these countries. The efforts of the international community, including those of China, are gaining strong momentum in cleaning up the dark corners which are haven to drugs.

Mr. Chairman,

We must note that the achievements in drug control so far are not easy to come by and our road ahead remains long and arduous. The Afghanistan Opium Survey 2006 published by UNODC in September has sounded an alarm: Opium cultivation in Afghanistan rose by 59% in 2006 as compared to last year, with harvest expected to reach a record 6,100 tons. The drug control situation in Afghanistan is worrisome and the international community should pay close attention to this problem and take active measures in response. It is important to address the root causes as well as the symptoms of the Afghan drug problem and both the supply and the demand should be addressed when identifying solutions. The international community should also pay close attention to the control of precursor chemicals and make joint efforts in preventing those used for heroine production from flowing into Afghanistan. The Chinese government is appreciative of the role played by the Paris Pact Process in resolving the Afghan drug problem. In June this year, China participated in the 2nd Ministerial Meeting on the Drug Problem in Afghanistan held in Moscow. China is prepared to work with all countries concerned and play a more active role in resolving the Afghan drug problem.

Mr. Chairman,

The Chinese government attaches great importance to drug control. Over the past year, China has achieved remarkable results in enacting drug control legislations and their enforcement. In November 2005, the Regulations on the Administration of Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances and the Regulations on the Administration of Precursor Chemicals newly enacted by the Chinese government came into effect, thus further substantiating China's legislative system on drug control. Meanwhile, China has been expanding its "People's Campaign against Drugs" and the awareness-raising and educational activities in this regard have achieved fruitful results. The law enforcement authorities solved numerous big cases of drug trafficking, dealing heavy blows to groups and individuals engaged in drug trafficking.

The Chinese government attaches importance to regional and bilateral cooperation in drug control. In October 2005, the ASEAN and China Cooperative Operations in Responses to Dangerous Drugs (ACCORD) International Congress was successfully convened in Beijing and adopted Beijing Declaration. That document serves as a guideline for the future regional cooperation in drug control. China has been conducting substantive cooperation with Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and Brunei. Through joint law enforcement, the formulation of regional plan of action and exchange of intelligence, we have effectively combated trans-boundary drug trafficking.

The Chinese government appreciates the work of UNDOC and the International Narcotics Control Board in the field of drug control and commends them for their positive role in maintaining treaty regime, monitoring compliance and providing technical assistance to their member states. China will continue to support the two agencies in their efforts.

Mr. Chairman,

States bears the primary responsibility in crimes prevention and punishment. However, faced with the prevalence of acts of terrorism, corruption and transnational organized crime, international judicial cooperation becomes indispensable. The Chinese delegation believes that judicial assistance, extradition, and confiscation of proceeds of criminals and return them to their rightful owners represent the core of international judicial cooperation. Both the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (TOC) and the UN Convention against Corruption (CAC) contain provisions in this regard. However, in actual application, for reasons like difference in legal systems among member states, the practice of double standards and over-emphasis on political considerations by some countries and the factor of domestic legislation, these provisions are yet to play their due role. The Chinese government hopes that double standards and political considerations be put aside so as to strengthen international cooperation in this area on the basis of the relevant treaties.

Mr. Chairman,

Over the past decade, the United Nations has greatly expanded its activities in the field of crime prevention and criminal justice. The UN Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (CCPCJ) is the main decision-making organ in this area. In order for the Commission to fully play its role, however, the following issues must be properly addressed: to clearly define CCPCJ's relationship with the conference of states-parties to TOC and conference of states-parties to CAC; to improve the working method of the CCPCJ; to acquire the authority to approve the budget of the UN Fund on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice. To this end, the Chinese delegation is in favor of adopting a draft resolution entitled "Strengthening the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Program and the Role of CCPCJ as its Governing Organ" at this session of the GA.

The Chinese delegation commends UNODC for its work in crime prevention and criminal justice. UNODC is currently consulting with member states with a view to formulating its mid-term strategy. We are convinced that guided by this strategy, UNODC will surely achieve greater results. We would also like to call on the developed countries to contribute more to UNODC so as to enhance its capacity of providing technical assistance to its member states.

Mr. Chairman,

Transnational crime, terrorism, corruption and drugs represent common challenges facing all members of the international community, the gravity of which requires that all countries, rich or poor, big or small, strong or weak, work together towards the betterment of the whole world instead of only taking care of one's own interests. Such an approach should be the natural choice for all.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

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