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Dalai Lama lies again
31 March 2008

2008/03/31

By Ye Xiaowen   |   From People's Daily Online

The 14th Dalai Lama has been quite busy recently, giving speeches everywhere with whatever words or remarks occurring to him and, of course, with a lot of sheer lies.

"I guarantee to the Han Chinese countrymen that I definitely do not attempt to separate (secede) Tibet," he said. On April 8, 2007, however, the same Dalai told an India TV station that Tibet was a fait accompli independent state about half a century ago.

He said he "absolutely does not have a scheme to create contradictions between Tibetans and Han Chinese…" It was nevertheless the same Dalai Lama, who said in a statement of March 10 this year that "the Tibetans are reduced to an insignificant minority in their own country… and, as a consequence, Tibetans are increasingly being assimilated quietly into the large Chinese population."

Moreover, in an interview with the "News Week" magazine of the U.S. on March 25, this year the Dalai Lama said he had met some better-off Tibetans, who are quite affluent and have good houses, but they felt a certain type of discrimination against them, which was beyond description.

Furthermore, for a serial of protests since March 10, Dalai said, the Chinese government unexpectedly accused him of all these protests. But why all these things could occur after March 10 in the first place? It is precisely the same Dalai Lama who has repeatedly said he appreciates from the bottom of his heart and takes pride for the faith, courage and resolve of people inside Tibet. Prior to giving this remark of his, he received the so-called "Tibet-Qinghai" Society and other organizations to suggest his ideas and issue hinted orders in indirect words. As he had expected, the so-called Tibet-Qinghai Society claimed that they were resolved to resume the independence of Tibet even at the cost of blood and lives in its March 10 statement.

So, the Dalai Lama appreciates such violence as beating, smashing, looting and arson, and lighting up flames over Lhasa, the capital city of China's Tibetan autonomous region on March 14, and the tragedy of a dozen innocent locals who were either burnt alive, beheaded or died of suffocation, or of beaten-up petrol police. On that very day of riot, Dalai said he held in esteem the desires of Tibetans in what they did and would not like to let them halt.

At a time when he became aware of his discreet remarks as people have vehemently denounced the violence recently, the Dalai Lama said on March 18 he would resign if the situation deteriorates. Then, he led an "inter-faith prayer meeting in remembrance of Tibetans who lost their lives".

Meanwhile, the Dalai Lama said ironically he had supported China's right to conduct Olympic games from the very beginning, and he noted that he still kept to this stance. It was the same Dalai, however, who claimed time and again on his tour of the European nations and the United States last year that 2008 was a crucial year, as the Beijing Olympics perhaps offered the last chance for Tibetans, and appealed to the nations concerned to link the Dalai Lama tells lies again

The 14th Dalai Lama has been quite busy recently, giving speeches everywhere with whatever words or remarks occurring to him and, of course, with a lot of sheer lies.

"I guarantee to the Han Chinese countrymen that I definitely do not attempt to separate (secede) Tibet," he said. On April 8, 2007, however, the same Dalai told an India TV station that Tibet was a fait accompli independent state about half a century ago.

He said he "absolutely does not have a scheme to create contradictions between Tibetans and Han Chinese…" It was nevertheless the same Dalai Lama, who said in a statement of March 10 this year that "the Tibetans are reduced to an insignificant minority in their own country… and, as a consequence, Tibetans are increasingly being assimilated quietly into the large Chinese population."

Moreover, in an interview with the "News Week" magazine of the U.S. on March 25, this year the Dalai Lama said he had met some better-off Tibetans, who are quite affluent and have good houses, but they felt a certain type of discrimination against them, which was beyond description.

Furthermore, for a serial of protests since March 10, Dalai said, the Chinese government unexpectedly accused him of all these protests. But why all these things could occur after March 10 in the first place? It is precisely the same Dalai Lama who has repeatedly said he appreciates from the bottom of his heart and takes pride for the faith, courage and resolve of people inside Tibet. Prior to giving this remark of his, he received the so-called "Tibet-Qinghai" Society and other organizations to suggest his ideas and issue hinted orders in indirect words. As he had expected, the so-called Tibet-Qinghai Society claimed that they were resolved to resume the independence of Tibet even at the cost of blood and lives in its March 10 statement.

So, the Dalai Lama appreciates such violence as beating, smashing, looting and arson, and lighting up flames over Lhasa, the capital city of China's Tibetan autonomous region on March 14, and the tragedy of a dozen innocent locals who were either burnt alive, beheaded or died of suffocation, or of beaten-up petrol police. On that very day of riot, Dalai said he held in esteem the desires of Tibetans in what they did and would not like to let them halt.

At a time when he became aware of his discreet remarks as people have vehemently denounced the violence recently, the Dalai Lama said on March 18 he would resign if the situation deteriorates. Then, he led an "inter-faith prayer meeting in remembrance of Tibetans who lost their lives".

Meanwhile, the Dalai Lama said ironically he had supported China's right to conduct Olympic games from the very beginning, and he noted that he still kept to this stance. It was the same Dalai, however, who claimed time and again on his tour of the European nations and the United States last year that 2008 was a crucial year, as the Beijing Olympics perhaps offered the last chance for Tibetans, and appealed to the nations concerned to link the "Tibetan issue" with the Beijing Olympics, and urge supporters to take to the streets in promoting Tibetans' appeals during the games period.

With these contradictory remarks of his, the Dalai Lama has begun turning uneasy and nervous himself with an ill, guilty conscience. Consequently, he preached again: As a Buddhist monk himself, he assured people that his desire was "sincere" and his motivation "earnest". Hence, we cannot but ask how the Dalai Lama abides by commandments of the Buddhist religion as it attached utmost importance to "four religious prohibitions", namely, the religious taboos against taking knife, burgling, pornographying and telling lies. Can he still be deemed as a "Buddhist monk"? The only answer people can now give is that "Dalai Lama has told lies again."

 

Note:

Mr. Ye Xiaowen, a People's Daily guest commentator, is Vice-President of the China Association for Preservation and Development of Tibetan Culture (CAPDTC). 

 

Dalai Lama Lies Again

 

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